The Glass Menagerie and Death of a Salesman Play Reaction

Tennessee Williams’ The Glass Menagerie and Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman are plays that demonstrate how drama imitates life. Tennessee Williams’ play describes his role in the family in memory of his mother. Tennessee, his mother, and his mentally challenged sister, Rose, are the main characters in the play autograph. The five characters and the story present the closest mimic to Tennessee’s actual life among his plays. Tom, character representing Tennessee Williams, works in a shoe warehouse, a disgusting job according to him, to support his mother, Amanda, and his sister, Laura. Such is a strong manifestation of Tennessee’s role in his family (Adams 4).

Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman play, on the other hand, capitalizes on personality. William Loman, nicknamed “Willy,” is portrayed in the play as insecure, self-duped, and economically unstable. Willy has childish character since he depends on other people for support on basic needs at 63 years. The appearance of his names suggests the same. “Willy,” an abbreviation of William, is childish. Loman, closely sounding like a low man, to some extent resembles his low position in the social ladder. He has low self-esteem (Adams 3).

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Tennessee’s play is full of soliloquy. In one of the passages, when Willy meets Biff and Happy in a restaurant, perhaps to get an update on job search, Willy becomes angry and flashbacks of the drama that unfolded when Biff visited him in Boston crosses his mind. Biff had unexpectedly bashed Willy having an affair with his receptionist while on a business trip. Biff and Happy leaves their father, only to be confronted by their mother on reaching home, why they left their father behind. The play shows Willy being left outside confused and talking to himself. After the climax, Willy believes Biff has forgiven him after hugging him, still talking to himself. Such talking to self is soliloquy-unfolding (Adams 1).

 

Works Cited

Adams, James Truslow. The Epic of America. Transaction Publishers, 2012. Accessed 9 April 2017.

Tennessee’s play is full of soliloquy. In one of the passages, when Willy meets Biff and Happy in a restaurant, perhaps to get an update on job search, Willy becomes angry and flashbacks of the drama that unfolded when Biff visited him in Boston crosses his mind. Biff had unexpectedly bashed Willy having an affair with his receptionist while on a business trip. Biff and Happy leaves their father, only to be confronted by their mother on reaching home, why they left their father behind. The play shows Willy being left outside confused and talking to himself. After the climax, Willy believes Biff has forgiven him after hugging him, still talking to himself. Such talking to self is soliloquy-unfolding (Adams 1).

 

Works Cited

Adams, James Truslow. The Epic of America. Transaction Publishers, 2012. Accessed 9 April 2017.