McKenna and Kleins’ views on Marketing

Naomi Klein, in her book, “No Logo: Taking aim at the brand bullies” explains the differences between advertising and branding stating that brand does not represent value and cannot be developed in a factory (2-3). She claims that the brand only symbolizes what the advertising department intends it to denote. Klein asserts that organizations are currently using modern techniques emphasizing on the need to focus on building brands instead of merchandise (6). She says that the success of business primarily depends on the labor variations and the intensification of branding. Klein further states that a work environment is also necessary for ensuring that an organization survives.

Have any questions about the topic? Our Experts can answer any question you have. They are avaliable to you 24/7.
Ask now

According to Klein, the initial mass marketing campaigns that started in the nineteenth century focused mostly on advertising but not branding (3). It is significant to create campaigns that can enable an organization to market any product as is the case with huge brands such as coca cola that are capable of selling almost any product because of their excellent reputation. Marketing a brand is therefore quite crucial instead of focusing on advertising.

On the other hand, McKenna, in the article, “Marketing is Everything” observes that marketing is a way of doing business adding that it is never running a campaign and waiting for an increase in sales (65). In his explanation, McKenna says that there have been three different types of companies reporting that the first one was sales drives, the second one was customer driven, and the latest one is market driven. McKenna posits that marketing should own the market by leading (70). Marketing is generally a process that cannot be achieved once because it involves all aspects of a business.

 

Works Cited

McKenna, Regis. “Marketing is everything.” Harvard business review 69.1 (1991): 65-79.

Klein, Naomi. No Logo: Taking aim at the brand bullies. Macmillan Audio, 2011.