Faith and the existence of God

The existence of faith represents one of the most discussed topics since time immemorial. Although the investments within the contemporary society have outdone those in past communities, the presence of God’s presence has continued to attract interest from scholars and non-scholars alike. One of the most significant roles played by the debate on whether or not God exists is the creation story. ‘While the creation story is one of the leading arguments employed invalidating the existence of God, this presence aids in the validation of the various events and processes that shape up the creation story (Tillich 90).’ There are different discussion areas on which the topic of God’s existence takes place. Although these arenas differ from each other, it is evident to note the role played by faith. Faith is the single most successful answer provided in light of whether or not God exists.

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Faith is understood and defined differently from one discussion platform to the next and from one individual to the other. Although there are different definitions and explanations attached to the subject of faith, there are common definitive elements linked to the myriad of interpretations” (Tillich 70). These common ultimate elements are the background through which a universally accepted definition is birthed and developed. Faith is defined as the evidence of things which a scene and the substance of things which are hoped for. From this description, it is evident to note that explaining whether God exists or not is just as complicated as defining and understanding the concept of faith. Faith appears to be complete confidence or unwavering trust in something or someone.

Tillich argues “faith precedes all attempts to derive from something else because these attempts are themselves based on faith” (Tillich 56). The dynamics of faith represent the grounds through which Tillich not only presents his stand on the debate on whether or not God exists but also the importance of arguing whether or not God exists. Employing faith in the argument of whether or not God exists begins by looking at the relationship between faith, emotion, and rationality. It is essential to underscore while faith provides room for sentiment and rationality to feature in its definition, it is not tied to these two elements in the explanation of whether or not God exists. Use of faith in arguing the existence of God, it transcends emotion and rationality and efficiently overcomes the gap between objectivity and subjectivity (Stenger and Stone an 84).

In the analysis of faith and how it features in arguing the existence of God, it is imperative to analyze the nature of faith. Most of what is justified by faith in light to the presence of God originates from what faith is, what faith is not also featured extensively in the debate of whether or not God exists. One of the essential things to note is that faith is not an act of knowledge that is shaped up by little evidence. Secondly, faith is not a product of emotions, and it does not function through emotional input. Lastly, faith cannot be built on or supported by knowledge or belief (Horne 95).

Conclusively, it is evident to not only note that faith is the evidence of unseen things and the substance of things hoped for, but also the most reliable tool and grounds through which whether or not there is the existence of God is debated and explained. Most of what is argued by faith in light to the existence of God is birthed from what faith is, what faith is not also featured extensively in the debate of whether or not God exists. When faith is employed in the argument of whether or not God exists, it does not overlook the relationship between faith, emotion, and rationality.

 

Works Cited

Horne, James R. The Moral Mystic.Wilfrid Laurier UP, 2008.

Stenger, Mary A, and Ronald H. Stone.Dialogues of Paul Tillich.Mercer UP, 2002.

Tillich, Paul. Dynamics of Faith: Perennial classic. HarperCollins, 2011.