Criticism over the Tell-Tale Heart By Edgar Allen Poe

The Tell-Tale Heart story written by Edgar Allen Poe is a good example of a psychological tale. The narrator denies the accusation that he might be mad with lines such as “how then am I mad” (74) and also “why say I am mad” (74). Primarily, he begins the story to prove his sanity. One day the narrator enters an old man’s house, drags him out of his bed, and kills him. Moreover, he cuts the old man into pieces and buries him under the floorboards. When the police question the narrator, he gets disturbed by the old man’s heart and confesses committing the crime and tell the officers where to find the body.

The trademark of horror in the story by Poe shows his height of artistic and imaginative powers, with an original story line, psychological context, and exquisitely rendered form. Importantly, the short story is a confession of murder by the narrator but with a terrible and apparent motiveless crime. Moreover, the narrator’s madness from the beginning of the story is evident, but with the author’s style of retelling, the story identification of the hallucination and the truth is left blurred making the narrator’s imagination seem real. In the story, Poe insists that each element of the story contributes to the total effect through perfect demonstration of the injunction.

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Moreover, every nuance in the tale leads to the overall unity and from the narrator’s protestation regarding his sanity at the beginning of the story toe the confession if the crime is a stylistic device that repeats phrases echoing the obsessiveness in the mind of the main character. Moreover, the interwoven symbolism in the story creates a frightening charged effect. The reception of the story upon its publication received much criticism from other authors and audience as well. Some argued that the tale was skillful and energetic the way the author tells the story. Moreover, well-established critics at the some of the publishing the story such as Horace Greeley stated that readable and wild.

Similarly, the tale was admired by other well-established authors such as Nathaniel Hawthorne. The author argued that the story influenced him and praised Poe for writing such a masterpiece. Similarly, when Russian translator Fyodor Dostoevsky was translating the story, he stated that the story was one of the best he had ever come across and acknowledged the author’s skill in writing such as suspense and symbolism that made the story enjoyable to read. However, Arthur Hobson Quinn’s in his autobiography did much to bolster the story by stating that it was and reflection of Poe theory on short stories. Later critics have argued that the story economic and structure makes powerful use of imagery.

In conclusion, other artist and critics a stated that the story is well structured and makes use of several stylistic devices making it enjoyable to read. Most critics over the years have praised the author for his skills and the powerful use if imagery. Some argued that the tale was skillful and energetic the way the author tells the story. Some claimed that the tale was accomplished and energetic the way the author tells the story. Moreover, the narrator’s madness from the beginning of the story is evident, but with the author’s style of retelling, the story identification of the hallucination and the truth is left blurred making the narrator’s imagination seem real.