Annotated Bibliography

Kizilcec, R. F., Pérez-Sanagustín, M., & Maldonado, J. J. (2017). Self-regulated learning strategies predict learner behavior and goal attainment in Massive Open Online Courses. Computers & Education, 104, 18-33.

The primary objective of this article is to examine the learning behavior between self-regulated individuals and less focused learner behaviors. The study also derived mechanism to help improve and guide learning processes linking active and weaker learners. The article tries to compare two individuals with different learning abilities and skills and how it influences their studying behavioral attributes. From the analysis, an individual with self-regulated skills possessed the ability to manage and plan their learning strategies. On the contrary, individuals with weaker self-regulated learning skills experienced difficult times to plan and manage their studying approaches (Pritchard, 2017). The article proposed learners can undertake training processes that involve self-regulated learning (SRL) like online-induced courses to boost their skills and abilities at large. In a sample of 4,831 participants, the outcomes on self-regulated learning implied individual achievement was due to strategic planning and goal setting. It is a useful article to use as it comprises verifiable information.

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Ruzek, E. A., Hafen, C. A., Allen, J. P., Gregory, A., Mikami, A. Y., & Pianta, R. C. (2016). How teacher emotional support motivates students: The mediating roles of perceived peer relatedness, autonomy support, and competence. Learning and instruction, 42, 95-103.

The study sought to examine the role of emotional support facilitated by teachers to adolescent students in a learning environment. The research also aimed to gather evidence of whether emotional support by teachers during learning affected students’ responses and behaviors. The study utilized a quantitative design with a sample size of 960 students in 68 classrooms aging between eleven to seventeenth years old. The study postulated that emotional responses and behavior of the students inclined towards their tutors’ motivation and encouragement. For instance, the study indicated teachers who were emotionally supportive influenced positive behavioral interaction and content mastery to the adolescent students. Precisely, where the tutors never revealed emotional support, the students’ behavioral engagement assumed a declining nature within a learning environment. The students negatively responded to their peers due to deprived motivation and relationship traits. It is a worth article incorporating in research as it entails emotional learning attributes linking teachers and student reactions.

Tewfik, A. A., & Lilly, C. (2015). Using a flipped-classroom approach to support problem-based learning. Technology, Knowledge, and Learning, 20(3), 299-315.

The study explores cognitive learning theory on the practical issues facing a couple of learners in the world of mathematics. The authors focused on bringing on board method that can improve problem-solving techniques. The author depicts that problem-based learning is vital to reach specific solutions. The research identifies mathematics as one of the potential disciplines that demand learners to apply particular concepts to attain the right answers. The analysis considers various approaches powered by technology to boost the cognitive reasoning of the learners in efforts to solve mathematical problems. The study employs a qualitative design to describe potential techniques likely to improve students thinking capacity. A typical example suggested by the authors includes the dispensation of ‘flipped classrooms.’ It is an initiative through which learners would interact with multimedia materials such as video clips regarding different mathematical operations. The article is essential using in research because it exposes learners to tangible ways of problem-solving.

Yang, S., Zhou, S., & Cheng, X. (2019). Why do college students continue to use mobile learning? Learning involvement and self‐determination theory. British Journal of Educational Technology, 50(2), 626-637.

The primary goal for this study was to examine immediate reasons college students continued to use mobile learning programs. The study sought to explore the linkage existing between mobile-based environment and the cognitive learning among the college students. The research also took into account stressors, such as self-determination that affected students’ mobile learning — the research utilized qualitative data from 309 colleges involving mobile-based programs using online class platforms. However, the study analysis revealed that self-management and peer influence played a significant role in promoting mobile learning programs. The attribute of peer influence and perceived learning support positively impacted on the cognitive learning engagement. The study outcome indicated the majority of the colleges’ students preferred mobile distance learning as cognitively influenced by their peers. In essence, there was a relationship between mobile and cognitive learning facilitated by the perceived support and peer motivation in the colleges (Staddon, 2016). The article is crucial, integrating into research due to the accurate examination of cognitive learning using qualitative and quantitative designs.

 

References

Kizilcec, R. F., Pérez-Sanagustín, M., & Maldonado, J. J. (2017). Self-regulated learning strategies predict learner behavior and goal attainment in Massive Open Online Courses. Computers & Education, 104, 18-33

Pritchard, A. (2017). Ways of learning: Learning theories for the classroom. Routledge.

Ruzek, E. A., Hafen, C. A., Allen, J. P., Gregory, A., Mikami, A. Y., & Pianta, R. C. (2016).

Staddon, J. E. (2016). Adaptive behavior and learning. Cambridge University Press.

Tewfik, A. A., & Lilly, C. (2015). Using a flipped-classroom approach to support problem-based learning. Technology, Knowledge, and Learning, 20(3), 299-315.

Yang, S., Zhou, S., & Cheng, X. (2019). Why do college students continue to use mobile learning? Learning involvement and self‐determination theory. British Journal of Educational Technology, 50(2), 626-637.