American History: A Changing World

The main groups that were affected by this event were Mexicans, Brazilians, Africans, Hispaniola’s, and Peru. Some effects were common in all these groups. All these groups were affected by a major decline in their populations. 100 years after European invasion of Mexico, the population decreased from 25 million to 1 million people. The invasion of Europeans brought many diseases that did not exist in America before (Bodmer, 1992). Many Americans died because of these diseases. All the groups lost most of their fertile lands and minerals. Mexico and Peru lost their silver mines to Spain who thus became the largest supplier of silver across the globe. Africans were forced into slavery whereby they worked on farms to create cash crops which were sold in the global market. Africa also lost most of their strong and tall men (Morison, 1974).

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Apart from the reduction of their populations due to diseases, the lifestyle and occupations of Americans were affected in many ways by the introduction of new trade routes. The depopulation of Americans forced them to settle for cheap labor to survive. When demands for labor increased, Europeans enslaved the Americans and forced them to labor in cultivating rice, tobacco, and indigo. In Hispaniola, residents had to pay an amount called tribute in honor of the Spanish leaders. The Americans also lost most of their key lands. Another way the Americans were affected is by the loss of their culture and native language. Most of the children that were born after invasion spoke English (Hart, 1971). In Africa, the loss of a huge number of men due to slavery had severe long term effect on the nations, families, and communities: the trade also led to internal African wars.

 

References

Bodmer, P. B. (1992). The Armature of Conquest: Spanish Accounts of the Discovery of America 1492-1589. Stanford Univeristy Press, pp. 40-47. Retrieved on January 20th, 2017 from https://books.google.co.ke/books?hl=en&lr=&id=Olj8np1TxBAC&oi=fnd&pg=PA1&dq=Bodmer,+P.+B.,+(1992).+The+Armature+of+Conquest:+Spanish+Accounts+of+the+Discovery+of+America.+Stanford+Univeristy+Press,&ots=KuiHY6fB41&sig=SX-5dAsfXjO-p05n2fVOeUfhEM8&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false

Hart, R. (1971). Cape Good Hope 1652-1702, pp. 260-273. Retrieved on January 20th, 2017 from http://www.rhinoresourcecenter.com/pdf_files/130/1305327739.pdf.

Morison, S. (1974). The Great Explorers: The European discovery of America, pp. 534-540. Retrieved on January 20th, 2017 from https://books.google.co.ke/books?hl=en&lr=&id=JnotvLHX80gC&oi=fnd&pg=PP1&dq=Morison,+S.,+1974.+The+European+discovery+of+America+:.+History,+2+(1)&ots=r5XYrlEkt5&sig=hMXEgt1j7-eT9A4xZsdcXrPfeMA&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false